Paying For College: Decisions, Decisions

At a recent speaking event, I was asked by a concerned parent, “How do I prepare financially for my kids to go to college?” As important a role as parents have in funding college, the kids have an equal if not greater role in the cost of college education. That is because the kids are the ones applying to schools and deciding where they apply and ultimately where they attend. This question inspired me to answer with a two-part post on Paying For College, with this post intended for future college students and the next post intended for parents or whoever will be paying for college.

Kids have a lot to consider when deciding where to attend college. Let’s weigh the financial impact of those decisions.

State school or private school? When we hear names of private universities like Harvard or Stanford, we all know they come with a hefty price tag. Based on those two colleges, $50,000 a year seems to be the going rate as an undergrad. Is it worth paying all that money to go to them? Maybe. But if you can’t readily afford $50,000 a year, will you be earning enough money after college to pay back your student loans? Do you even want student loans to eat a portion of your paycheck after college? US News & World Report calculated in-state tuition to be 73% less than private colleges. Imagine your favorite gadget or clothes at 73% off. That’s a hard deal to pass up! If your heart is still set on being an Ivy League grad, perhaps it’s worth considering a transfer after you have attended a year or two at a state college. Just remember, there is more than one path you can take.

Live at home vs. dorm/apartment? Another reason to consider an in-state college is to save on living costs. Living away from home can be pretty expensive. Not only do you have the cost of boarding, but you also have to think about food, laundry, dorm/apartment goods and travel to/from home. These are conveniences you didn’t have to worry about when you were in high school. Are you moving your car with you to college? That’s another bundle of expenses, from gas to parking. Living costs are probably as big a decision as college tuition itself.

To work or not to work? In addition to studying and partying, you will probably end up working during college. How else do you afford your college lifestyle? While a job teaches valuable lessons and can propel your future career, it can detract from your time and attention. Keep this in mind before you choose a college with a price tag that requires you to work. On the opposite end of the spectrum, there is the option to take a year off to gather working experience and build savings before continuing education. Some employers even offer to pay for a portion or all of your education expenses. Only you know what options are right for you, but the point is — you have options.

Scholarships and financial aid? Just like you apply for colleges, you can also apply for financial aid. Don’t be afraid to try for scholarships and financial assistance. You’re already filling out forms and writing essays for college applications. What’s another application? You might need some help from a parent to fill-out financial aid forms, but otherwise, this falls in your ballpark. You have to make the effort to apply!

These are some important considerations that not only impact your college decision, but also impact the rest of your life. So even if you’re not the one paying for college, your decisions matter!

Homework: Time to do some research! How much is tuition at colleges you like? What would your living situation be, and how much would it cost?

If you like this lesson and want to see more, please consider a donation on GoFundMe.

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