Do You Need A Rainy Day Fund?

Rainy day fund. Emergency fund. Cash reserve. Call it what you prefer, but the important thing is to have one. What is a rainy day fund? It’s money set aside to weather unexpected “storms” in your life. For instance, did your car break down, and you need money for a repair? Lost your job and need money to survive until you find another job? Have a big medical expense that came out of the blue? When you suddenly need money, you’ll be thankful that you have a rainy day fund.

To build your own rainy day fund, you need to save towards it. Make it one of your savings goals, just like any other big purchase you wish to make. As you accumulate money in your rainy day fund, you may decide to cap it after a certain amount. If you earn steady income, you may find that an amount equivalent to 3 months’ expenses is a sufficient target goal for your rainy day fund. If your income fluctuates from month to month, you may feel more comfortable with covering up to 6 months of expenses through your rainy day fund. Some people choose to continue saving towards their rainy day fund even after they reach a comfortable amount. That way, if they ever need to break into the rainy day fund, they already built in a way to replenish what was spent.

Young savers probably don’t have a reason to save for a rainy day fund. After all, Mom or Dad is the rainy day fund. Kids can break from this mentality by having something to be responsible for. What is a possible sudden expense that can hit? Maybe it’s a vet bill for your pet. Or perhaps a replacement for a broken cell phone. It might even be new cleats for soccer. If kids are given the responsibility, they will more likely build a habit of saving for that rainy day fund.

Why make a rainy day fund a savings priority? Let’s play out the scenario without a rainy day fund. You could tap into savings for other goals to pay for this expense. But that means giving up or delaying those other goals. Some goals, like college or retirement, don’t have much room to postpone. If no savings exists, you would need to borrow money. Borrowing money requires that you pay back the loan, with additional interest, and that payback eats away at the money you earn. Not to mention if another unexpected expense occurs, even more money goes into paying debt. To prevent debt from taking control, put that rainy day fund first!

Regardless of what other financial goals you have, a rainy day fund should be at the top of your list. If it suddenly rained, wouldn’t you rather have an umbrella? That is exactly how a rainy day fund works!

Homework: What is the right amount for your rainy day fund? If you do not have one already, how much can you devote from monthly savings to build your rainy day fund?

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Compound Interest

In addition to the seven natural wonders of the world, Albert Einstein believed in an eighth wonder of the world: Compound Interest. What is compound interest? In a nutshell, it’s money making money.

How does one unlock the door to compound interest? Through investing. The easiest way to understand investing is to think of a plant. Start with a seed (investment), and the plant will eventually sprout branches. Some branches will have leaves (interest), but others will sprout new branches, which yield more leaves (more interest). Sure, there may be setbacks, but if your plant thrives, your little seed has grown into something much larger. Imagine if you could do the same with money? You can! That is the power of compound interest. Branches growing more branches.

Time plays an important factor in investing. Just like plants need time to grow, your money needs time to grow interest and then more time for that interest to compound into more interest. The earlier you invest, the more your money can grow on its own. To calculate what time can do for your money, use the Rule of 72.

Rule of 72: Divide 72 by the (%) interest rate you earn, and the answer is how many years it will take for your initial investment to double. For example, if you earn 8% interest on a $1,000 investment, 72 divided by 8 equals 9. Without adding any more money, that $1,000 investment will double to $2,000 in 9 years.

When it comes to investing, your choices vary widely, but they boil down to a few basic types.

Cash

Believe it or not, cash is a type of investment because it has the potential to earn interest. Some common cash investments are money market accounts or certificates of deposit (CD). Although cash tends to be the least likely investment to lose money, it does not typically yield a lot of interest. But for short-term needs, also known as liquidity, this is a good choice to earn a little bit along the way.

Bonds

Have you ever borrowed money and needed to pay interest when you returned the money? When you invest in a bond, you are loaning your money to others, and after some time, they pay back your initial loan with interest. There are many types of bonds you can invest in, so the interest rates and chances of getting your money back fluctuate depending on who you are loaning the money to.

Stocks

Buying stock is essentially owning a part of a company, hence you buy “shares” of that company. A stock earns money when the company is viewed favorably by investors and loses value when the company is viewed negatively. Stocks have vast potential to grow, but also come with the risk of losing money. Much like plants weather different seasons, stocks can take a bumpy ride. This is why stocks should be seen as long-term investments, so that your money is given a chance to ride out any volatility. You may have also heard of investments called mutual funds, index funds, ETFs, options. These are simply variations of investing in stocks and sometimes bonds.

Real Estate

Ever wonder why most people say buying a home is better than renting? It’s because buying a home gives you the opportunity to earn money when you sell the home, assuming the home grows in value. To invest in real estate, do you have to buy a house? No. You can actually invest in real estate companies through real estate investment trusts (REIT) or even buy shares of publicly traded real estate companies on the stock market.

Tying It All Together

When thinking about what to do with your savings, you will most likely take more than one approach to investing. You may even have investments not listed above. The key is to plant those seeds, and then witness the wonder of compound interest!

Tune in next week as we explore credit cards. Good thing or bad thing? Subscribe below to automatically receive weekly lessons in your inbox!

Homework: Do your research! Choose 5 of your favorite companies or brands that are publicly traded on the stock market, and follow their stocks for the next month (or longer). If you initially invested $10,000, how much did you earn?

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How Much Money Should I Save?

The million dollar question (pun!): How much should I save?

Well, there’s a complex answer and a simple answer. In most cases, you’ll get the complex answer.

It depends.

Everyone’s number is different because we each have different savings goals. Saving for a car is different than saving for a house. Saving for a house is different than saving for college. Saving for college is different than saving for retirement.

Some factors that aid in calculating your savings number:

  • How much do you need for your goal?
  • What have you already saved?
  • How long before your goal takes place?
  • Where will you invest your savings, and at what growth rate?
  • How much can you afford to save?

As adults, your savings number will likely be limited to the last question: How much can you afford to save? I challenge you to reverse your thinking: How much can you afford to spend? Recite the following motto, specifically in this order: SHARE, SAVE, SPEND.

Looking at spending last will be a good way to focus on your savings goals and forces you to examine how much you must earn to afford your lifestyle.

A good rule of thumb is to save one-third (1/3).

Earlier I mentioned that there is a simple answer to the question of savings. If you are young and don’t have any major goals yet or are just starting out, a good rule of thumb is to save one-third (1/3). Any time you receive money, share a third, save a third, and spend the rest!

So ask yourself the question: How much should I save? Don’t get discouraged if your number seems high. Remember that you can adjust some factors to reach your savings goal, like decreasing or delaying your goal. Even if you save a small amount now, you are still building the blocks to your financial future. As you continue, increase your savings little by little. Soon enough, you will be savvy at saving without giving it any thought!

Tune in next week to learn why “sharing” is first on my list. Or subscribe below to automatically receive weekly lessons in your inbox!

Homework: The next time you get allowance or money, make sure you know how much is going into each of the 3 S’s: Share, Save, and Spend. Can you save one-third or more? What would a small increase in savings do for your goal?

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