Do You Need A Rainy Day Fund?

Rainy day fund. Emergency fund. Cash reserve. Call it what you prefer, but the important thing is to have one. What is a rainy day fund? It’s money set aside to weather unexpected “storms” in your life. For instance, did your car break down, and you need money for a repair? Lost your job and need money to survive until you find another job? Have a big medical expense that came out of the blue? When you suddenly need money, you’ll be thankful that you have a rainy day fund.

To build your own rainy day fund, you need to save towards it. Make it one of your savings goals, just like any other big purchase you wish to make. As you accumulate money in your rainy day fund, you may decide to cap it after a certain amount. If you earn steady income, you may find that an amount equivalent to 3 months’ expenses is a sufficient target goal for your rainy day fund. If your income fluctuates from month to month, you may feel more comfortable with covering up to 6 months of expenses through your rainy day fund. Some people choose to continue saving towards their rainy day fund even after they reach a comfortable amount. That way, if they ever need to break into the rainy day fund, they already built in a way to replenish what was spent.

Young savers probably don’t have a reason to save for a rainy day fund. After all, Mom or Dad is the rainy day fund. Kids can break from this mentality by having something to be responsible for. What is a possible sudden expense that can hit? Maybe it’s a vet bill for your pet. Or perhaps a replacement for a broken cell phone. It might even be new cleats for soccer. If kids are given the responsibility, they will more likely build a habit of saving for that rainy day fund.

Why make a rainy day fund a savings priority? Let’s play out the scenario without a rainy day fund. You could tap into savings for other goals to pay for this expense. But that means giving up or delaying those other goals. Some goals, like college or retirement, don’t have much room to postpone. If no savings exists, you would need to borrow money. Borrowing money requires that you pay back the loan, with additional interest, and that payback eats away at the money you earn. Not to mention if another unexpected expense occurs, even more money goes into paying debt. To prevent debt from taking control, put that rainy day fund first!

Regardless of what other financial goals you have, a rainy day fund should be at the top of your list. If it suddenly rained, wouldn’t you rather have an umbrella? That is exactly how a rainy day fund works!

Homework: What is the right amount for your rainy day fund? If you do not have one already, how much can you devote from monthly savings to build your rainy day fund?

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