Allowance

April marks National Financial Literacy Month in the US, so why not take this time to learn (and teach) about money? It can be difficult to understand money at a young age because children cannot make money through employment like adults do. By the time children reach an age where they can work for money, they have already witnessed many financial transactions and have pre-determined values and practices around money. There is a void between when children form money habits and when they can start to earn money of their own. That is the case for an allowance — to fill in this gap.

Once children are old enough to start helping around the house (usually by age 3), it’s time to consider an allowance.

Just like money doesn’t come free for adults, children should “work” for their allowance, doing things like household chores or achieving good grades. Once children are old enough to start helping around the house (usually by age 3), it’s time to consider an allowance. Other than money that is gifted and the occasional lemonade stand (or passion project), an allowance gives children money of their own to manage.

Deciding on all the rules around an allowance requires some planning ahead. Here are some questions to think about.

  • Does the amount change every year based on bills or obligations that the child assumes, such as a cell phone, or school lunch, or gas? Or does allowance simply increase by a pre-determined amount each year?
  • What frequency makes the most sense — weekly, bi-weekly, monthly?
  • Would it be easier for you and your child to handle allowance in cash or through direct deposit or cashless transfer (Venmo, Zelle, etc.)?
  • What situations warrant a partial or zero allowance?
  • Does paying allowance rely on task completion? If so, how do you measure and monitor on an ongoing basis?

Ideally, the requirements are the same for each child and do not stray from the plan over time, but you can certainly make exceptions if financial circumstances change. Pay reductions and unemployment happen in real life, so the allowance may have to be lowered or paused at times. On the flip side, when times are good, consider adding a bonus for a job well done or starting a matching contribution when certain savings milestones are met. An allowance should teach about both the good and bad times.

If you’re puzzled on where to begin with an allowance, stick to this simple plan. Base the amount of allowance on the age of the child, and pay on a weekly basis. For a child who is 3, the allowance would be $3 per week. For a teenager who is 15, allowance is $15 per week. This continues until your child starts working or graduates from high school, whichever comes first. Lean towards paying allowance in cash, so that your child can hold the true fruits of their labor.

Once an allowance is in place, then all the other lessons about money become easier to learn. A good first lesson is Share, Save, Spend. From there, help children understand taxes by automatically deducting a household tax. Instead of paying $4 per week, the household tax reduces allowance to $3 per week. Set up an auto-savings for one-third (1/3) of the allowance to deposit directly into a bank account for long-term savings. If children need to borrow money, ask them to come up with a payment plan, and reduce allowance by the amount of the payment plan accordingly. These are the lessons that will mentally prepare children for a future of managing their own money.

Happy Financial Literacy Month!

Homework: There’s no such thing as free money! Before starting an allowance or making the next allowance payment, parents and children can collaborate together on a chores chart or achievement chart to earn that allowance.

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